Fused glass Art

There are many forms of glass art. Fused glass is one of them. The basic idea behind fused glass is that art objects are created by melting glass in a kiln.  Unlike stained glass, fused glass has no “lead lines”.  Unlike blown glass, the learning curve is relatively short and projects are easier to make. The precise origins of glass fusing techniques are not known, but there is archaeological evidence that the Egyptians were familiar with these techniques. While other glass techniques enjoyed a revival during the Renaissance, fusing was largely ignored during this period. Fusing began to regain popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s.

A few years ago, I took a class to learn about fused glass techniques.  It was a really fun class that made me want to be able to make more things. Months later, when a glass supply company had their kilns on sale, I decided to invest in getting one.  Fused glass has since become another hobby that I like to pursue. I have enjoyed creating many nice pieces of fused glass art over the past couple of years.  I will, over time, try to post some of these previously made items.

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Recently, I tried a new glass idea.  The birthday of  my sister-in-law, Ruth, gave me an excuse to make something kinda fun.  Ruth likes cats.  But, unfortunately she is allergic to them and can’t have any cats of her own.  So, I decided to make her an allergen-free cat.  I selected blue glass to match the colors in her home.

 

 

This cat turned out so cute, that I decided to make someIMG_2169 more.

I next tried some burgundy colored glass. These almost look like foxes.

 

After that, I decided to try to make some cats that looked like some of our pets.

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After making these, I realized that I wanted to make some more pets.  A little bit of time on-line and I found some clipart images that I want to try.

The kiln will be busy again!

What if?

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My husband treated my younger son and I to Easter Brunch today.  While eating, our son asked his dad how is day was going.  His response “It’s the best day of the year!”

That is the truth on this Easter Sunday.  It’s Resurrection Sunday and  Jesus is alive! We have hope in Jesus Christ and that hope makes this truly the best day of the year. The empty tomb of Jesus that gives us HOPE!

HOPE of forgiveness

HOPE of peace

HOPE of assurance

HOPE of Heaven

Hope of eternal life.

 

But, for many, they have walked away from that hope.  To them, I suggest to ask yourself “What if?”  What if your wrong?

What if?  Lyrics by Nichole Nordeman

What if you’re right?
And He was just another nice guy
What if you’re right?
What if it’s true?
They say the cross
Will only make a fool of you
And what if it’s true?

What if He takes His place in history
With all the prophets and the kings
Who taught us love and came in peace
But then the story ends
What then?

But what if you’re wrong?
What if there’s more?
What if there’s hope
You never dreamed of hoping for?

What if you jump?
And just close your eyes?
What if the arms that catch you
Catch you by surprise?
What if He’s more than enough?
What if it’s love?

What if you dig
What if you dig
Way down deeper than
Your simple-minded friends

What if you dig?
What if you find
A thousand more
Unanswered questions down inside
That’s all you find

What if you pick apart the logic
And begin to poke the holes
What if the crown of thorns is no more
Than folklore that must be told and retold

But what if you’re wrong?
What if there’s more?
What if there’s hope
You never dreamed of hoping for?

What if you jump?
Just close your eyes?
What if the arms that catch you
Catch you by surprise?
What if He’s more than enough?
What if it’s love?

You’ve been running
As fast as you can
And you’ve been looking for a place
You can land so long
But what if you’re wrong?

What if you jump?
And just close your eyes?
What if the arms that catch you
Catch you by surprise?
What if He’s more than enough?
What if it’s love?

 

Crocodile Flower Crochet Pillow with Crocheted Daisies on the back.

Every bed runner needs a nice decorative pillow to complement the design. Usually, for me, this means making a pieced and quilted pillow to match.  This time, however, I thought it would be nice to try something different.  So, I settled on
crocheting a pillow.
The nice thing about crochet is that I can take it with me to work or when running errands.  That way if I am stuck waiting, I can work on my project.IMG_2119
When I first learned the crocodile stitch (February 9, 2016 posting) , I really liked the way it looked.  And, this stitch seemed to me that it would match my daisy runner very well. Using some yarn in my stash, I started working on this.  When it was done, I thought it was a nice complement to my quilt.
But, what to put on the back?
Well, it’s a daisy bed runner.  So, why not try some crocheted daisies.  I did an on-line search for a daisy pattern but was unable to find one with leaves behind the petals. So, why not make up my own pattern.  With a little trial and error, using some features of the crocodile stitch, this is what I came up with.
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And, here is my pattern:
Supplies:
E hook (smaller hook and thread yarn if you want this flower smaller)
Yellow, white, green and blue worsted weight yarn
Abbreviations:
sc=single crochet
sl st=slip stitch
ch=chain
hdc=half double crochet
dc=double crochet
With yellow yarn ch 4, sl st to form ring
Rnd 1: ch 3 (counts as first dc), work 15 dc in ring, sl st = 16 dc
Rnd 2: ch 2 (counts as first sc and first ch1 space), *sc ch 1 in dc* repeat 15 times, sl st to first sc  = 16 (sc ch1)
Rnd 3: ch 3 (counts as first sc and first ch2 space), *sc ch 2 in dc* repeat 15 times, sl st to first sc. Cut and weave in end  = 16 (sc ch2)
Slip stitch in with White yarn for the petals
Rnd 4: *sc, chain 9, sc in first ch2 space, hdc in the next ch2 space*. Repeat * to* 7 times, sl st to first sc = 8 (sc, ch9 loop, sc, hdc)
Rnd 5: ch 4 (counts as first dc and first ch1 space), *dc between scs keeping yard behind ch9, ch 1, dc in hdc, ch 1*. Repeat * to* 7 times, sl st to first sc.  Cut and weave in end = 16 (dc, ch1)
Slip stitch in with Blue yarn to a ch 1 space after the dc behind the ch9 loop for background
Rnd 6: ch 4 (counts as first dc, ch1), *dc  in dc between loops, ch1, dc on ch 1 space, ch1, dc in dc behind loop, ch1* repeat 7 times, sl st to third ch  =  16 (dc, ch1)
Rnd 7: ch 1 (counts as first sc), *sc in ch 1, sc in dc, sc in ch1, (sc, ch6, sc in dc), * repeat 4 times, sl st to first sc  = 4 (5sc, ch6 loop, 1 sc)
Rnd 8: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in next 5 sc, *ch3 behind loop, dc in 6 sc*, repeat two times, ch 3 behind loop, sl st to first ch3   = 4 (6dc, ch3)
Rnd 9: ch 1 (counts as first sc), sc in next 5 dc, sc, hdc, dc, ch2, dc, hdc, sc in loop, *sc in 6 dc, sc, hdc, dc, ch2, dc, hdc, sc in loop*, repeat two times, sl st to first ch1   = 4 (7sc, hdc, dc, ch2, dc, hdc)
Rnd 10: ch 1 (counts as first sc), sc in next 8 stitches, sc, hdc, dc, ch2, dc, hdc, sc in loop, *sc in 12 st, sc, hdc, dc, ch2, dc, hdc, sc in loop*, repeat two times, sl st to first ch1. Cut and weave in end  = 4 (14sc, hdc, dc, ch2, dc, hdc).
Slip stitch to chain 6 loop in Rnd 7 with Green yarn  for the leaves
Rnd 11: 4 dc, ch 1, sl st to sc of background, 4 dc. Cut and weave in end.  Repeat in each chain 6 of rnd 7 = 4 leaves
Slip stitch to chain 9 loop in Rnd 4 with White yarn  for the petals
Rnd 11: 4 dc, sl st to sc of background to side of leaf, 4 dc, sl st to sc of background on other side of leaf, 4 dc. Repeat 7 times. Cut and weave in end = 8 petals

Spring Has Sprung!

It’s April, the birds are singing outside my window, the bulbs are coming up in my gardens and the grass is starting to get green.  So, it’s time to change the decor in my bedroom – a new Daisy Bed runner really added some springtime color.

 

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To make this bedrunner, I used the leftover blue fabric from the backing of my butterfly quilt as the main background.  To supplement the blue, I took out some of my custom dyed fabric samples, generally ones that were trials on different dyeing techniques. For added color, I decided to try out some fabric paint crayons.

A few years ago, I took a class on Shiva Paintsticks and Rubbing Plates.  I enjoyed the class and purchased some supplies.  However, time being in short supply, I really hadn’t used them since completing the class.

This project, I thought would be a good use of the paintsticks to embellish the fabrics that I had in my collection. After a day of painting, I set the fabrics aside for a week to allow the oils in the dye crayons to dry.  The dye pigment was then heat set by ironing the fabric between pieces of brown paper (absorbs the excess oils very nicely).  The resulting fabrics were really interesting.

Triangles were cut out of the fabrics and the border was then made by alternating triangles of blue and color.

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To enhance the bedrunner, daisies and leaves were appliqued onto the center panel. The runner was quilted and the binding added.