Featured

Small Shibori Quilt

I originally published this post on Sunday. However, for some reason the article disappeared from my blog. I know it was originally there, but someone asked about why I took it down.  When I went to check, it was gone. Luckily, I had saved a copy on my computer so I am able to repost today. 

My previous post, “The Ants (and other bugs) Come Marching In“, was also changed after I posted it.  For some reason the date of that post was changed by a couple of weeks.  So, instead of being a mid-July post, it is showing up in June.  I am not exactly sure what is happening. WordPress has changed their setup and that seems to be messing with my blog.  

For those who already read this article, I apologize for your having to receive it twice. For those who did not receive the original, please enjoy.

Pam

Free time is hard to find now that I am back to work. However, while my office was closed down in the spring, I had lots of extra time available. One of the things I did during my time off was to work on some fabric dyeing ideas.One bright sunny day, I set up some sun dyeing on my deck. I had seen this technique on a different blog (Tamarack Shack) and wanted to try it.I wanted to try larger shapes that I could then quilt around. I cut some large flowers out of cardboard, placed them on the dyed fabric and set them out in the sun for a couple hours. Unfortunately, and unexpectedly, the wind must have been a bit too strong at some point, because when I went to check on it, the cardboard had moved and distorted. The resulting dye blocked shapes were rather indistinct. I did like how the pink and purple splattered dye turned out. But the shapes were not as I had hoped. So, I’m planning to try this experiment again. Next time I will weight down my shapes with rocks or something heavy.Rather than just stashing the dyed fabric away to use whenever inspiration hit, the next day I decided to work on an idea that I had for a Shibori quilt.Last summer, I posted about a Shibori table quilt I had made. Using the same technique, I designed the stitching pattern for the shibori, the fabric painting, and the quilting. All of the running stitches were completed with polyester thread. This is a rather time consuming step that took about fifteen hours to complete.The pink flowers were then painted with dye mixed with print paste.The Green leaves were painted.The threads were gathered and tied tight.And the background was dyed blue.This project sat in my sewing room for a few weeks. Now, after a couple hours of long arm quilting and I am finally done with this project.

Nui Shibori Table Quilt

Fabric Dyeing has been a fun, creative way to make unique fabrics for my quilting.  This spring, I spent some time playing around with stitched shibori.  I wanted to figure out how to create drawings in the dye.  I also wanted to try hand painting before and after dyeing the fabric.

So, I set out to do a few experiments.

Experiment #1. Nui Shibori flower and over-dyeing painted fabric

  • Draw pattern on the fabric with a water soluble fabric marker
  • Stitch the drawn lines  with polyester thread
  • Dissolve Dye in 1 ml Urea Water, Add 2 T Print Paste, 14 ml Urea Water, 1/8 tsp Mixed Alkali, Mix well
  1.               Dark Pink = ¼ tsp Mixing Red
  2.               Light Pink = 1/16 tsp Mixing Red
  3.               Dark Blue = ¼ tsp Mixing Blue
  4.               Light Blue = 1/16 tsp Mixing Blue
  5.               Green = 1/8 tsp Evergreen
  • Paint dye on fabric areas within the shibori stitching

IMG_2592

  • Paint dye in sections for over-dyeing

Dye Paint

 

  • Allow to dry for 4 hours
  • Pull center threads and tie off

IMG_2589

  • Place in 1000 ml of 0.15 mg/ml Mixing Blue Dye (with Soda Ash)
  • Batch for 5 hours
  • Wash with Blue Dawn, Dry and Iron

IMG_2593

Dye Paint Overdye

Lessons Learned:

  • Shibori pattern turned out well
  • Dye painting turned out well, but the the color edges were too crisp – use less Print Paste next time
  • Over-dyeing does not change the underlying painted color very much

Experiment #2.  Whole Cloth Pattern:

  • Design quilting using QuiltCAD program

Capture

  • Stitch section outlines on long arm with polyester thread for pattern placement when quilting
  • Draw shibori pattern by holding water soluble marker in the needle position and running pattern on trace

IMG_2636IMG_2638

  • Hand stitch shibori sections

IMG_2642

 

  • Dye Paint:
  1. Mixed Alkali: ½ tsp mixed with 8 ml Urea water
  2. Yellow: 1/8 tsp Golden Yellow in 10 ml Urea water; Combine 1 ml concentrate with 6 ml Print Paste, 3 ml Urea water and 0.6 ml Mixed Alkali
  3. Green: 1/8 tsp Evergreen in 15 ml Urea Water. Combine 7.5 ml concentrate with 15 ml PP and 1.5 ml MA
  4. Dark Pink: 1/8 tsp MR in 15 ml Urea water.  Combine 7.5 ml concentrate with 15 ml PP and 1.5 ml MA
  5. Light Pink: Combine 3 ml MR concentrate with 15 ml PP and 1.5 ml MA
  • Paint on Fabric sections of shibori stitching

IMG_2697

  • Allow to dry for 4 hours
  • Pull center threads and tie off
  • Stitch Floss “Ties” to center of fabric to help with lifting in/out of water
  • Make Dye Concentrate: Mixing Blue 10 gm in 100 ml Urea Water (100 mg/ml)
  • Place in 4000 ml Soda Ash solution in bucket
  • Add dye concentrate at 5 minute intervals (10 ml, 10 ml, 10 ml, 10ml, 40 ml) = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 2.0 mg/ml to create an ombre effect
  • Lift fabric a small amount after each dye increment
  • Prop fabric up on support dripping into empty bucket, cover with plastic bag

IMG_2699

  • Batch for 4 hours

IMG_2701

  • Clip and remove all sewing lines
  • Wash with Blue Dawn, Dry and Iron

IMG_2852

  • Quilt as planned

IMG_2942

Lessons Learned:

  • Paint center dye before pulling tight the outer threads – easier than having to paint on a bubble
  • If you forget the first step – sealed air packs work well to fill the bubble for painting

IMG_2700

  • Fabric will trap air, creating a bubble, in the middle – easy to keep the center section out of the dye bath.
  • Use a color of thread different from the color of dye – makes it easier to remove the threads.
  • The fabric dye paint did not turn out as well as I had hoped.  So, after quilting, I repainted the fabric dye without Print Paste for a smoother look

 

I entered this quilt in the Minnesota State Fair on a whim to see what the judges comments would be regarding the shibori  and hand painting technique.  Boy was I surprised that it was awarding a blue ribbon!

 

Shibori Quilt

Sometimes, when working on a quilt, parts of the original design are adjusted and changed as I proceed with the project.  This was the case when I was making the large butterfly quilt that I described in August 2016 posts.

Early in the design process, I had thought that a rainbow shibori border would look nice.  To create the border,  I made four 9″ x 90″ shibori panels with red, blue and yellow dye.  These panels turned out lovely.

The next step was to dye the fabric that the butterflies would be appliqued onto.  When planning out this step, I changed my mind about the border and decided that I wanted the butterflies to be in a more “natural” environment.  So, I made four more panels of shibori that looked like grass.  This change was perfect for the quilt at that time.

However, I had the rainbow shibori panels already dyed.  Not knowing what I wanted to use them for, I just stored them in my fabric stash and didn’t really think about them for a few years.

Recently, when organizing my fabric, I ran across these panels and decided I really needed to use these in a quilt. Utilizing a simple triangle quilt design, I combined the shibori  fabric with a black fabric.  This was a quick project that turned out really nice. I love the optical illusion that the dyed fabric creates.

IMG_3006

 

Arashi Shibori Experiment

Arashi Shibori, pole wrapping, creates an interesting dye pattern in the fabric. Because I liked how my initial samples turned out (see April 13, 2016 and August 12, 2016 postings), I decided to do a small experiment.  To assess the effect of the amount of compaction of the fabric has on the dye pattern, the following experiments were completed.
Experiment #1:
1. PVC pipes with caps (to reduce the amount of dye needed)
2. Three pieces of fabric  cut 8″ x 45″, stitched together using a long stitch length to form a tube of fabric, and scrunched onto the pipe
3. Scrunch one piece of fabric:
– loosely, about 20″ in length
– moderatly, about 15″ in length
– tighly, about 10″ in length

8 inch wrap

Experiment #2:

1. PVC pipes with caps (to reduce the amount of dye needed)
2. Three pieces of fabric  cut 9″ x 45″, stitched together using a long stitch length to form a tube of fabric, and scrunched onto the pipe
3. Scrunch one piece of fabric:
– loosely, about 20″ in length
– moderatly, about 15″ in length
– tighly, about 10″ in length
9 inch wrap

 

Experiment #3:

1. PVC pipes with caps (to reduce the amount of dye needed)
2. Three pieces of fabric  cut 10″ x 45″, stitched together using a long stitch length to form a tube of fabric, and scrunched onto the pipe
3. Scrunch one piece of fabric:
– loosely, about 20″ in length
– moderatly, about 15″ in length
– tighly, about 10″ in length

10 inch wrap

I now have samples that I can refer to when planning to dye fabric using this technique. Can’t wait to try some more fabric dyeing.

Nui Shibori

Nui (Japanese for sewing) involves using a simple running stitch to pull the fabric tightly together. The thread is secured with a knot before dyeing. The technique allows for greater control of the pattern but is much more time consuming.

Trial #1
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. Sew six sets of lines (each set includes two lines 1/4″ apart) each 1″ apart.

3. Pull the threads tight and tie knots.

4. Place the bound fabric in the bottom of a flat container.  Add Mixing Red dye (500 ml at 5 mg/ml).

4. Batch for 2 hours.

5. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.  Resulting scarf is shown above.

Trial #2
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. Sew zig-zag lines lines each 2″ apart.

3. Pull the threads tight and tie knots.

4. On each side of the pulled and bound fabric, paint on Golden Yellow and Green (4 mg/ml, 100 ml total).

5. Batch for 2 hours.

6. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.

Kumo and Kanoko Shibori

Today’s shibori techniques – Kumo and Kanoko.

Kumo (Japanese for spider) is a twist and bind resist technique. It involves binding fabric around objects or by pleating sections of the fabric very finely and evenly. The result is a very specific spider-like design.

Trial #1
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. Place a small pony bead on the fabric and bind with a 1/4″ rubber band (Orthodontic elastic). Continue binding beads to create the pattern that you would like.


3. Place the bound fabric in the bottom of a flat container.  Add Royal Blue dye (500 ml at 5 mg/ml).

4. Batch for 2 hours.

5. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.

Trial #2
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. Pull up sections of the fabric at one end of the piece and bind tightly with synthetic sinew. Fold and bind a larger section of fabric at the other end of the piece.


3. Place the bound fabric in the bottom of a container.  Add Lilac dye (500 ml at 3 mg/ml).

4. Batch for 2 hours.

5. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.  Resulting scarf is shown above.

Kanoko is what is commonly thought of as tie-dye. It involves binding certain sections of the cloth to achieve the desired pattern. The pattern achieved depends upon how tightly the fabric is bound and where the fabric is bound. If the cloth is first folded and then bound, the resulting circles will be a pattern created by the folds, creating a cross between a mandala and tie-dye.


Trial #3
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. Fold in triangles up the length of the fabric.

3. Bind the fabric in sections with synthetic sinew.

4. Soak in soda ash solution for 30 minutes.


5. Drip dye solution (25 mg/ml) on each section to form a color pattern.

6. Batch for 2 hours.


7. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.

 Trial #4
1. Fabric cut 36″ x 36″.

2. Fold the fabric as described for mandalas.

3. Pull fabric together in sections and bind with sinew.

4. Soak fabric in warmed soda ash solution for 30 minutes.

5. Place fabric in tray over bucket.

6. Cover with scrap fabric to collect undissolved dye particles.

7. Cover with 4″ of snow and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of mixed dye powder (Mixing Blue, Royal Blue, Turquoise  and Green).

8. Place lid over the bucket and allow to sit at room temperature until snow is melted.

9. Pour 250 ml of warm soda ash solution over the fabric to help set the dye.

10. Rinse fabric in cold water. Wash in hot water with blue Dawn soap. Rinse, dry and iron.

Arashi Scarf and the Technique for Itajimi Shibori

Before I describe another Shibori technique, I thought I would show a photo of the Arashi Shibori Scarf from my last posting.

Very fun colors!

To refresh your memory, there are five major forms of Shibori –
Arashi
Itajimi
Kanoko
Kuno
Nui.


Itajimi is a shape-resist technique. The cloth is folded like an accordion and sandwiched between flat shapes which are held in place with string or clamps. The shapes prevent the dye from penetrating the fabric that they cover.

Trial #1
1. Fabric cut 9″ x 18″, folded in fourths lengthwise. Then folded in triangles.

2. Bind the triangle together with string or a rubber band.

3. Dip the corners into different colors
Turquoise: 20 ml at 4 mg/ml
Mixing Red: 20 ml at 3 mg/ml
Lilac: 20 ml at 1 mg/ml

4. Batch for 12 hours.

5. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.

Trial #2
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. Ends folded in fourths lengthwise. Then folded in accordion style with wooden discs inserted between each secondary fold.

2. Bind the bundles together with string or a rubber band.

3. Dip each end in a dye bath
(250 ml at 1 mg/ml)
Lilac
Fuchsia

4. Batch for 12 hours

5. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.

Resulting Scarf

 Trial #3
1. Fabric cut 12″ x 90″.

2. One end folded in fourths lengthwise. Then folded in accordion style with plastic stars inserted between each secondary fold, making sure that the star points match between the layers.

3. Clamp the fabric bundle together with a utility clamp.

 3. Dip the fabric bundle in a dye bath
250 ml at 5 mg/ml Mixing Blue

4. Batch for 12 hours

5. Rinse out excess dye with cold water. Wash with Blue Dawn in hot water.

My plan is to use another Shibori technique to dye stripes on the other end of this scarf.

That will be a project for another day.