Fused Glass Sun Catchers

I’m playing with glass again!  

I have read that it is best to put glass on a kiln shelf to make sure that the temperature around the glass is as uniform as possible. But, I have a small kiln with a bit over 4 inches of height, making using a kiln shelf only possible for fusing flat. Also, I have been wondering if I can “double up” and flat fuse a couple items at the same time, one on the floor of the kiln and one on an elevated kiln shelf. 

To test the effects of location in the kiln, I decided to make some sun catchers for my sewing room.  After cutting the glass pieces, I compiled one sun catcher on the floor of the kiln. Then the kiln shelf was elevated above it on 1″ posts. Two more sun catchers were put together on the shelf. The glass was fused following a contour fuse schedule. I selected contour fuse because I wanted the glass pattern be more distinct and crisp than full fuse would create. Also, I thought this temperature would better show if any differences would result from the location in the kiln. 

What a learned was that placing glass directly on the kiln floor caused the glass to reach a higher temperature. 

The sun catcher fused on the floor of the kiln was closer to full fused and lost much of its defined lines. Still pretty, however. 

The two sun catchers fired on the kiln shelf were truly contour fused – defined glass edges but nicely smoothed. 

These are now hanging in my sewing room window. I think I may actually make some more soon for the other window in the room. 

Garden Art – Fused glass flowers and butterflies. 

I’ve recently shared some of my art projects for my gardens. Over the years I have enjoyed making several other projects. This year, having to  redo a worn out front yard (retaining walls and plantings), I am relocating some of my older pieces of art.

So, I decided to post a few pictures of some flowers and butterflies that I made in the past.

Enjoy the images!

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Fused Glass Mushroom

I have accumulated a long list of ideas for glass projects that I want to try.  Having recently replaced the landscaping in my front yard, I decided to try one of these ideas and add some new “art” to my perennial garden.

Fused glass mushrooms are one of the fun ideas that was on my list.  The ones that I have seen, the caps were created using pre-made patterned glass that is cut into a circle and then slumped into the shape of a mushroom.  For the stems, some were made with blown glass, others with PVC pipe.  But, the ones that I really liked were made with the top half of recycled bottles.

After completing a few pot melts, I decided that these would make great mushrooms. Also, by using scrap glass and recycled bottles, this would be an inexpensive craft.

I thought it would be fun to add some spots to the mushroom caps.  To make these, I first made some glass pebbles. The nice thing about glass is that it naturally settles to a quarter inch in thickness and prefers a round shape.  So, small pieces of glass were stacked and full fused.

These pebbles were then placed on top of one of my pot melt discs and full fused again.

After cooling the disc was placed on a slumping form.  For some of my mushrooms, I used a stainless steel form.

For others, I used a clay form.  I prefer the shape of the mushroom made with the clay mold, but the others turned out very nice as well.

To make the stems, I used a Kinkajou bottle cutter to cut the bottom off of wine bottles and sparkling cider bottles.

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As you can see below, both types of bottles look nice. However, I prefer the sparkling cider bottles because the nice green color is more visible in the mulch of my flower garden.

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