Hat and Scarf Sets

Each year, my dental office works with a local charity to collect and donate items to children in need.  Whether it be “Toys for Tots” or “Hats and Mittens”, our doctors, staff and patient families actively participate.

This year, I decided to combine my love for crafts with this donation opportunity.  Having knit and crocheted several scarves earlier in the year, I decided to make some hats to go with the scarves. I have tried making mittens and gloves but without much success.  So, I purchased a pair of waterproof gloves to go with each set.

Queen Anne’s Lace Scarf, Crochet hat

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Variegated Yarn Infinity Scarf and Headband

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Lace Knit Infinity Scarf and Hat

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Islet Crochet Scarf and Rib Knit Hat

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Swirl Knit Scarf and Crocheted Hat

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Ripple Crochet Scarf and Wavy Knit Hat

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I hope these are enjoyed by the person who receives them.

 

Give Thanks!

A year ago, with Thanksgiving approaching, I decided to make a decorative fused glass plate for my kitchen. IMG_2537

 

  • Grapes: Transparent Glass full fused to make 1/2 inch pebbles.
  • Corn: Varied pieces and colors of glass full fused to make small pebbles.
  • Cornucopia (streaky tan) and Pumpkin (streaky orange) opaque pieces heat polished (1300º F) to smooth the edges, transparent amber fine frit between each piece prior to fusing the plate.
  • Words: Photo Transfer Paper, Delphi Glass
  • Light Contour Fused (1325º F) to create plate.

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All went well until I placed the glass in a ceramic mold to slump it into a plate form.

Unknown to me, the contractor that was doing some work in our family room shut off the power to a few circuits.  The power to my kiln was interrupted and when I returned from work and opened the kiln, my plate had cracked. Bummer!

Unfortunately, this meant that my plate was not ready for Thanksgiving last year.

So… back to cutting and heat fusing.

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This time, all went well and I now have a plate to display for Thanksgiving this year.

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To salvage the cracked glass, I broke it into smaller pieces, pot melted the pieces and made a beautiful melt plate.

 

More Donation Quilts

Having received a large quantity of fabric from my sister, I needed to make room for storing this.  Sorting through my current stash of fabric, I found a container of dyed fabrics that I had made when trying different dyeing techniques.

These swatches were each 5″ x 5″.  Many of my original dyeing samples were used in previous projects,  such as described in “Fabric Dyeing” and “Spring has Sprung“.

The ones left were a bit dull in color. No longer needing these, I decided to make another of the many quilts in my “Future Projects” folder on my computer.  To brighten them up, I combined them with white fabric and use variegated thread for the quilting.  It’s amazing how the white makes even drab fabrics look cheery.

This was a simple pattern that combined these 250 different swatches in long rows separated by white sashing, turned on point and set in asymmetrically.  I really like how it turned out. IMG_2732

Reworked quilts to donate.

This summer, I received two large boxes of craft supplies from my sister.  When the boxes arrived in the mail, I had so much fun sorting through the contents. Thanks Sis!

In the boxes there was yarn, started crochet projects and yards and yard of fabric!  Some of the fabrics were precut into strips and squares, others were whole pieces of fabric.  And, still others were already sewn sections.

After sorting through the boxes and finding storage spots the multitude of supplies, I decided to finish some of the projects that she had started.

In the box were three pieced quilt tops, each very similar, and some corresponding excess fabric.  The pieced tops were comprised of sixteen blocks (set 4×4), each quilt measured 84″ x 84″.

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Since my plan was to donate these quilts, I needed to rework them to a twin XL size.  To accomplish this,  each of the quilts needed to be longer.  However, since the three quilts were each slightly different, I couldn’t just take four blocks off of one and add them to the end of a second quilt.  I needed to take them apart and rearrange the blocks.  In doing so, I decided to use a different fabric for the sashing between the blocks.  Using a fabric with very little pattern helped to set off the blocks and make them more eye catching.

The first quilt included twenty identical blocks reset with the new sashing fabric.

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The second quilt was similar.  However, there were not enough matching blocks to make the quilt of only one block.  So, the quilt was made alternating two different blocks.

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Starting out with three quilts, each with 16 blocks, I had a total of 48 blocks to use.  With 20 in each of the two quilts I had already completed, I only had 8 blocks left over for the final quilt.  I did also have some yardage of matching fabrics.  So, some creative block setting and use of the extra fabrics and I had a third quilt pieced.  I really like this one!

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After quilting and binding, I sure hope someone finds these a comfort on the cold winter nights that will be coming all too soon.