Hand applique and embroidery

How do you applique a two sided quilt?

You think, think, plan, think some more, plan again and then finally jump in and do it.  That kinda describes the process I went through when contemplating the idea of embroidering an identical tree on both sides of a quilt.

Idea #1

  •  adhere light weight fabric adhesive to the back of two pieces of fabric for the tree trunks
  • draw the tree trunk onto the fabric and cut out two identical trees
  • adhere the tree to one side of the quilt and baste in place
  • adhere the tree on other side and then machine embroidery through all layers of the quilt and tree
  • machine quilt the details onto the tree
  • Concern – machine quilting will cause the quilt to be “flattened” and lining up the edges of the tree on each both sides of the quilt would be difficult

Idea #2

  • baste stitch the outline of the tree onto the quilt
  • cut out fabric to match the tree
  • use needle turn embroidery to stitch the tree onto each side of the quilt
  • machine quilt  the details onto the tree
  • Concern – it might be difficult to control the amount of fabric involved while doing hand embroidery

Idea #3

  • pin large pieces of the tree fabric to both sides of the quilt
  • machine quilt the tree details onto the tree
  • trim the fabric approximately 5/8″ – 3/4″ away from quilting details
  • use needle turn embroidery to stitch the fabric to the quilt
  • This was ultimately the idea I decided to use for the trees, sun and moon

DayNightTree

Daytime detail:

I decided to hand applique leaves onto the daytime side of the quilt.  To do this, I pinned pieces of green fabric onto the quilted tree.  Then I machine quilted the outline and veins of a leaf onto each piece of fabric.  After cutting around each stitched leaf, I used needle turn embroidery to secure the edges of the fabric.

Nighttime detail:

I did not want to use the same technique on the nighttime side of the quilt. So, after completing the daytime side, I used the quilting lines as a guide to paint faint green fabric dye onto the leaves and then hand embroidered outlines around the leaves.

DayNightLeaves

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Unfortunately while quilting the leaves onto the daytime side, my long arm machine handles fell off the machine while I was working on a leaf.  When this happened, the needle broke and the broken needle tore the fabric through all layers of the quilt.  This picture shows that even on the backside of the quilt, the broken needle tore the fabric. I was really bummed!

To fix the tear, I could applique a leaf onto the daytime side.  But, how do I fix the tear on the nighttime side.  I could applique leaves on this side as well.  However, that was more applique then I really wanted to do.  And, I had really wanted the two sides of the quilt to use different techniques.  This was really frustrating.

Ultimately, I decided to add a bit more detail to the quilt.  By appliqueing an owl on the nighttime side and a cardinal to the daytime side, I was able to repair the quilt and no one can even tell that the quilt was torn.

BirdOwl

A good repair and some nice details for the quilt! I have added more details to the quilt that were really fun to do.  I will post about those soon.

Custom Footrest For My Craft Room

img_2230Lately, I have been doing a lot of hand stitching – applique, embroidery and quilt binding.  When hand stitching, I like to have a place to rest my your feet higher than the floor in order to make myself more comfortable. Unfortunately this was something that I did not have in my new craft room.

img_2253Wanting to add one, I starting looking around the room to see where I could store the footrest when it was not being used.  The size of a place to stash the footrest would be the limiting factor for the size of the footrest itself.  With the room maximized for storage, I was not finding a good spot to keep one.  So, I put off purchasing one.

 

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This past week  I have been working on binding a quilt.  As a temporary measure, I pulled out one of my storage boxes from under my long arm table and used that to prop my feet on.  It worked out fairly well, just the right size, but a bit too low. So, to get the height right, I  put a folded flannel quilt on top of it.

Unfortunately the quilt I used was a favorite of my cat, Onyx.  Most times, when I went into my room to sew, she was sleeping on the quilt. So, I needed to figure out a more permanent option.  img_2229

A trip to Hobby Lobby to purchase a few items (2″foam, 5/8 yd print canvas fabric and elastic braid) and I was ready to make a slip cover to place on the storage box.  First, I cut the foam to fit on top of the box lid (10.5″ x 14″).  Then, I cut the fabric to 20.5″ x 24″.  A few box seams in the corners, a hem with the elastic into and I was done.

img_2254Now I have  a colorful and comfortable foot rest. When not in use it fits nicely into the original storage spot without taking up any space in my room.

 

 

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I even had enough leftover fabric to make a nice throw pillow for my sofa.

Happy Independence Day!

FlagPlate

In honor of our American Independence Day, I am posting a picture of a glass plate that I made which combines two of my favorite crafts, quilting and fused glass.

The design is based upon the Friendship Block.  The pattern is two of these blocks of different sizes superimposed upon one another to make a single block.

Pattern

It is possible that the resulting block design has another name. If so, I am unaware of it.

Supplies:
  • Spectrum Blue and Clear Wispy Coe 96 glass, cut to match pattern
  • Uroboros Clear and White Streaky Coe 96 glass, cut to match pattern
  • Uroboros Clear and Grenadine Coe 96 glass, cut to match pattern
  • Clear Coe 96 glass, 7″ x 7″
  • 7″ plate mold

 

A two sided quilt – sounds easy, right?

You have probably seen adult coloring books in stores over the past few years.  Meant as a way to unwind from daily stress, these books can take an adult back to their childhood days of coloring.

Since my crafts are my way to relax at the end of a day, I have not purchased any of these coloring books.  I have however, looked at the books in stores.  The pictures are complex and do provide great inspiration for quilting patterns and applique designs.

Last summer, I paged through one of these coloring books with trees.  Each design featured a tree with unique patterns.  Some of the designs had animals in the trees – owls, birds and even cats. One day I may make one of these, perhaps a tree with many different owls appliqued on the branches.

Directly next to the display of coloring books, was a different display featuring paper craft ideas. One idea showed strips of wrapping paper cut and glued horizontally in the background, and featured cutouts of black or white paper animals, flowers or trees as the main object.  Sorry, but I did not think to take a picture of the display. But, it was a really nice idea.

This idea stuck with me, and besides thinking about making some greeting cards with the idea, I realized that a quilt could be made with a similar design.  At the time I first saw the display, my paper craft supplies were buried in the back of my craft storage closet, so the cards would need to wait.  But, I did have lots of fabric that I could utilize for a quilt.

So, I set out to work on my new design.  Many of my batik scraps were blue and green, which would work well for the background of a tree.

Sorting through the fabrics, I couldn’t decide whether I wanted a the colors to depict a tree during the daytime, the nighttime, or an unsorted scrappy look.  After playing around with a graphic program, I ruled out the scrappy look because it was too chaotic for my liking.  But, I simply just couldn’t decide which of the other two I preferred.  So, I thought I would try something new and make a two sided quilt – one side with bright daytime colors, the other side with darker nighttime colors.  After cutting 2 1/2″ strips, the fabrics were sewn together with some shorter pieces inserted periodically to add some variation to the background.

Since I had decided to try to make the applique exactly reversible, the quilting the front and back together would need to be done next.  When loading the pieced backgrounds onto my long arm machine, I realized that making a completely reversible quilt was going to be rather difficult.

This year, in particular, my ideas for quilts have been easy in the planning stages, but more challenging when actually sewing.  This quilt was no exception.  On paper, it looked straightforward – sew the strips, load it on my quilting frame and quilt away.  Right!  Actually, wrong.  Lining up so many seams on the front and the back of the quilt prior to machine quilting was definitely not easy.  I discovered that even though my piecing was exact, the number and location of the seams impacted the stretch and movement of the two pieces of fabric.  I ended up having to pin along each seam of the layers to try to get my quilting to look right on both the front and the back of the quilt. IMG_1042

Backgrounds

Once the backgrounds was quilted, I decided to get my least favorite part of any quilt (the binding) done before I  would start work on the appliqued tree.  More on that in my next posting.

Since moving into my newer sewing room, my paper craft supplies are now accessible, so cards can once again be made.  That project will be included in a future post as well.

New Craft Room

With three of our four boys living out of town, we have several unused bedrooms in our house.  Earlier this spring, I decided that these unused rooms could be put to better use.

Until recently, my long arm sewing machine was in the smallest of these bedrooms (11′ x 11″), a tight fit for a 10 foot table.  My domestic sewing machine was in our laundry room.  And,  my craft supplies were in various closets throughout the house.

One of the unused bedrooms is a fairly nice sized room.  At 12′ x 15′, it is almost 50% more space than the small room that I was using.  So, I decided to move my crafts into this larger room.  Sorry boys, but the guest room is now in a bit smaller!

After spending a few months planning out the change, I have recently settled in to my new craft room.  I love my new space, and so does my cat Onyx.

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I now have all my crafts (except fused glass) are all in the same room.  This means that I can work on multiple projects at the same time.  I can set my long arm sewing machine to stitch out a computer guided pattern, while cutting a paper craft project on my Cameo cutter and piecing another quilt on my domestic sewing machine.

When moving in to the room, I sorted and organized all of my supplies, and even found some things I forgot that I had. I may not complete more projects, but I will certainly enjoy working in this room, especially with the large corner window.

Some useful features in the room:

  1. wall mounted TV with cable and an HDMI connection view on-line programs,
  2. a love seat that is also a sleeper sofa (a place for someone to sleep if all of our boys come home at the same time),
  3. a side table by the love-seat  to hold my coffee, computer and other items I need handy,
  4. noise cancelling headphones (to block out the sound of the sewing machine when I am watching a program on the TV),
  5. several thread organizers for the various spools/cones of thread that I use,
  6. a large closet for storing a cart with my Cameo cutter, my large format printer and lots of other supplies,
  7. storage cubbies underneath my long arm table,
  8. two desks, a dresser and shelf unit with even more storage,
  9. a mounted drapery rod that is large enough to hang a queen sized quilt for photography, and
  10. an attached bathroom.

Since I now had a dedicated craft room, I also wanted to add a design wall.  Originally I thought that I could make something that utilized the quilt hanging rod. After purchasing fabric (Kaufman Framework Flannel Gridwork), I added a lining and rolled it onto the rod.

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Unfortunately the flannel kept wanting to unroll and not stay neat and tidy.  To try to solve this problem, I added Roman Shade cords to the back of the flannel.  But, when pulled up, the fabric would also slide together on the rod and again not stay neat and tidy.

So, I ultimately attached the flannel to some wooden boards and made true Roman Shades to use for the design wall.  These boards were  mounted at the edge of the ceiling and drop down when needed.  I could only mount one section on the main wall of the room because I did not want to block the air intake which was located on one end if that same wall.  To give me more design space, I mounted the second section above the closet.

This is not ideal because large projects will be split into two separated spaces when working with the design wall.  However, it does put design space very near my sewing desk.  This will be handy when I am in the middle of a project.  I will just have to get used to having large projects split into two sections.  But, since I really didn’t have a design wall before, this arrangement is certainly better than nothing.

Wind chimes from wine bottle.

IMG_1933When I started making fused glass mushrooms, I had to ask friends for empty wine bottles because I generally don’t drink any alcoholic beverages and so we had none at our house.  In doing this, I was received several colors of bottles – dark green, olive green, clear, blue, brown and amber.  Since the green are the only ones that worked well for mushroom stalks, that left me to think about other ideas for the different colors of bottles.

So, last week when I needed something to recognize an outgoing president of one of the organizations I am a member of, I decided to use one of the clear wine bottles to make another unique recognition item – a wind chime.

Supplies:IMG_2678
  • Clear Wine Bottle
  • Kinkajou bottle cutter
  • Rubbing Alcohol
  • Adhesive Stencil
  • Armour Etch Glass Etching Paste
  • Craft stick
  • Gloves, eyewear, apron
  • Drop Cloth
  • Coe 96 white glass
  • Heat resistant wire
  • Wooden Disks/Beads
  • Chain
  • Various Beads
Instructions:
1. Following the directions for use, cut the bottom off of the wine bottle using the Kinkajou bottle cutter.  I scored and cut about one inch up from the bottom.  Smooth the edge with glass file or glass sanding pads.
2. Clean the surface of the glass with rubbing alcohol, making sure to remove all finger prints.  Firmly adhere the cut stencil on the bottle.
3. Apply the Armour Etch paste to the glass following the suggestions in my original post about glass etching.

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4. Create a wind scope or wind sail.  I cut two tooth shapes out of white fusible glass.  These were full fused together with a wire loop at the top to facilitate assembly of the wind chime.
5. Using wire and pieces of chain, string together the beads to a visually pleasing length.  I used a wooden wheel shape for the striker and a wooden candle cup turned upside down to keep the beads from pulling out of the bottle.
The resulting wind chime creates a pleasant sound and a unique piece of visual art!

Happy Easter, He is Risen! Καλό Πάσχα και Χριστός Ανέστη!

Yes, I know,  I am not Greek Orthodox, nor am I from any of the countries that observe Orthodox Easter.  But, since we were traveling last Sunday, we had our Easter celebration today.  And, since Easter is a celebration of Christ’s resurrection, shouldn’t we celebrate every day of the year!

He is risen indeed. Ἀληθῶς ἀνέστη!

Prior to leaving for Spring Break, I spent some time making an Easter plate for my kitchen plate holder.  I think it turned out really well.

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The creation of this plate involved several steps:

  1. Base of plateIMG_1607
    • Bottom glass – clear layer of glass measuring just under 7″ square
    • Top glass – medium blue outer border 1/2″ wide, green noodle (standing on edge) and varied sized pieces of variety of transparent blue glass in a patchwork pattern
    • Light amber glass cut in 5/8″ strips to make the base of the cross
    • 7″ square stainless steel form, lined with shelf paper
    • Full fused
  2. Pieces of purple transparent medium frit to make grapes full fused (visible on the right side of the stainless steel form in the photo above)
  3. Green noodles and stringer, bent by holding the glass in the flame of a soldering torch
  4. Dove and dove wing cut from thin iridescent white glassIMG_1609
  5. Leaves cut from thin green glass
  6. Cross cut from dark amber glass, slumped over 1/8″ fiber paper to be able to “weave” the glass
  7. Cross, dove, vines and grapes place onto base glass and light contour fused to the plateIMG_1612
  8. Slump in a plate mold.